10th Dec, 2016

Polish murderer arrested in Coventry and detained for deportation

Coventry Editorial 22nd Dec, 2015 Updated: 28th Oct, 2016

A POLISH murderer has been detained for deportation after being arrested in Coventry.

The 36-year-old was among a number of people arrested by West Midlands Police as part of a crackdown on suspected foreign offenders in the UK.

The man was convicted of murder in his homeland in 2004 and served a six year jail term.

As part of the police drive more than 700 people have been arrested and 550 vehicles have been seized.

Operation Trivium was launched from a national command centre in Birmingham and linked in with intelligence in Europe.

The week-long operation saw police work with partner agencies including the National Crime Agency, Gangmasters Licensing Authority and Immigration Enforcement.

In the hunt for suspected overseas crooks officers were able to communicate with intelligence experts at Europol’s HQ in The Hague, Holland.

This helped to provide police patrols on UK roads with a complete picture on any suspects they encountered.

Across the UK there were 10,103 vehicles stopped, 554 seized and 717 arrests made as part of Trivium which ran from November 23 to November 27. In the West Midlands there were 1,267 stopped, 206 seized and 97 arrested.

Supt Paul Keasey, who is the European operations commander for the operation, said it was the fifth running of Trivium and it proved a hugely successful.

He added they linked in with intelligence experts at The Hague in Holland who were able to provide valuable information leading to arrests.

Supt Keasey said officers across the West Midlands did roadside checkpoints and supported immigration officials on visits to businesses suspected of employing foreign over-stayers.

“The number of arrests should send out a strong message that there is no hiding for criminals and the borders hold no barriers when it comes to bringing about justice,” he added.

Claire Portlock of Immigration Enforcement’s West Midlands team said supporting the police on operations like this meant they could maximise their potential for uncovering immigration abuse.

During the joint operation, officers also made arrests across at businesses in Birmingham, Hereford, Solihull and Telford.

Ms Portlock said: “This is part of the wider work Immigration Enforcement teams undertake across the UK every day to locate and arrest illegal migrants, reduce illegal working and take away the unfair advantage gained by those who employ illegal migrants.”