Coventry doctor's book, inspired by the death of her dad, aimed at helping those going through the grieving process - The Coventry Observer

Coventry doctor's book, inspired by the death of her dad, aimed at helping those going through the grieving process

Coventry Editorial 14th Oct, 2020 Updated: 14th Oct, 2020   0

A COVENTRY doctor has written a book inspired by the time in her life when her dad was diagnosed with a terminal illness.

Dr Marianne Trent, Clinical Psychologist for the NHS and in private practice, wrote ‘The Grief Collective – Stories of Life, Loss and Learning to Heal’.

Marianne’s dad was diagnosed in 2016 and died in 2017.

Between those days she spent time talking to supportive and empathic people she fondly regarded as her ‘Dead Dad Club’ – they ‘got grief’ and knew what to say and, most importantly, what not to say.




After experiencing this Marianne wanted others in the midst of grief to tap into that level of understanding.

The Grief Collective book is aimed at giving people the chance to be as well supported by a group of grief-informed people as Marianne was by her Dead Dad Club.


It was written as part of a Facebook psychologist challenge to write and publish a whole book in a month and Marianne put it all together during last month (September, 2020). Whilst the book was already on Marianne’s agenda this challenge prompted her into action.

She said the complex relationship the world has been having with grief in 2020 also made it a timely publication.

The book contains stories from ordinary people who have experienced grief through bereavement or loss of some other kind.

All of the stories were written in September 2020 and some of them relate to losses in 2020 and so there are mentions of how Covid-19 and lockdown have affected people’s grief.

The diverse range of stories from people aged between their late teens and mid-70s include coping in the aftermath of suicide, murder, stillbirth, miscarriage, illness and accident.

Each story is unique and gives the reader the opportunity to hear of other ways people have been helped and begin to heal.

Marianne said: “In my work as a clinical psychologist I am often told by clients other people don’t like to talk about feelings of sadness, regret, guilt or anger because it’s uncomfortable and people aren’t sure what to say and how to help.”

She added books and online forums were available to support people experiencing grief but this book enabled them to surround themselves with a collective who understood grief and knew it was okay to talk about things even if they cannot be fixed.

Click here for more on the book or to buy it in paperback or Kindle version.

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